Supporting Healing ♦ Teaching ♦ Research
Hadassah International eBulletin - Autumn 2014Print
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Welcome to the Autumn 2014 Issue
Editors:
Patricia Levinson, Hadassah International Communications Chair                  Karen Eisler, Website Co-Chair
Lonye Rasch, HMO Communications ChairKaren Lustig, Communications Team
Ellen Frick - Delman, Communications TeamNichole Hutter, Communications Team
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Leading Hadassah oncologist, Prof. Tamar Peretz, Interim Director General of the Hadassah Medical Center and Director of Hadassah's Sharett Institute of Oncology, rejects  the recent recommendations  published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that urge all Jewish women of Ashkenazi descent to be tested for mutations on the BRCA 1 and 2 genes, which are associated with a higher risk of breast cancer.


Barbara Sofer, Hadassah's Israel Director of Public Relations, has received many warm words of appreciation from grateful patients who want to express their thanks to the hospital's supporters around the globe.


Last week, Paratrooper Oron Ronen's sunny, single room in the Hadassah Medical Center's Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower was full of candy, fruit, and small electric appliances. These were all gifts for the wounded soldier, who was injured in Israel's latest defense mission, Operation Protective Edge. After two weeks at Hadassah, he was finally ready to go home.


Israeli Paratrooper Began His Physiotherapy at Hadassah
Israeli Paratrooper Hayim Levtov, who sustained hand and leg injuries while fighting in Gaza, has begun physiotherapy at Hadassah Hospital-Mount Scopus.


While on a break from serving with the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) in Gaza, Dr. David Rekhtman, head of the Pediatric Emergency Room at Hadassah Hospital-Mount Scopus, came to visit one of the dozen wounded soldiers from his unit. This was his first day back at work after three weeks of serving in reserve duty.


The Terrorism that Flared in the Jerusalem Area and the Terror Victims at Hadassah Hospital

By Barbara Sofer

August 5, 2014.  A third terrorist attack occurred in the area of northern Jerusalem, the third attack in 24 hours.

In nearby Maale Adumim, a terrorist stabbed 63-year old Yair Avraham, a municipal guard. With multiple stab wounds in the abdomen, down and bleeding, Avraham was rushed to Hadassah Hospital's Mount Scopus campus.  Surgeons stopped the bleeding and closed the internal wounds. By late afternoon Avraham woke up in the recovery room. His wife Zippora, his children, the Mayor of Maale Adumim and the Hadassah staff were all there. I was there, too. I told him that the eyes of 330,000 women and men in America, and supporters around the world were all turned to him, and that we all send him a refuya shleima (full recovery).

In the meantime, on the same floor of the Mount Scopus hospital, at the intensive care unit, the parents, sister, and friends of Chen Schwartz, 19, were taking turns going in to visit him. The wounded soldier is still being kept asleep to recover from the hard surgery he underwent yesterday after being shot twice at close range by a terrorist on a motor scooter near the underpass to Mount Scopus. "The care here is so wonderful," said his mom Miri Schwartz. "The staff is wonderful and embracing. Please pass on my thanks to the Hadassah women and supporters abroad who have created this wonderful hospital. We have no illusions. Without them, our son would have died. He's a strong boy, and with God's help and Hadassah's, he's going to make it."

Prof. Achmed Eid, head of Surgery at Mount Scopus, admitted that the surgery was very difficult because of the massive bleeding and huge damage. "We used everything we could to save this man. When you are in such a situation at Hadassah, you know that you will never give up until you find a way to save him." Prof. Eid added that the surgery has removed Chen Schwartz from danger, but that he needs further surgery to improve his condition as soon as he is strong enough.

Surgical Nurse Ruven Gelfond, who headed the Israel Defense Forces field hospitals in Haiti and the Philippines said the Mount Scopus team was determined to do the near-impossible life-saving task.

If you want to keep him in your prayers, his name is Chen ben Miriam and Meir.

To see a video interview with Prof. Eid, please go to
https://www.dropbox.com/s/sog4vvwr4xu8skh/20140806_135850%20%281%29.mp4

Downstairs in the Mount Scopus garden, paratrooper Chayim Lev Tov, 22, was visiting with a group of fellow soldiers. He sustained wounds in his hand and leg in Gaza and will be regaining motion in them at Hadassah, a process that will require a lot of hard work and encouragement, according to Dr. Isabella Schwartz (no relation to Chen) who heads the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. "We're confident he's going to be just fine." He asked me to thank all the wonderful friends of Hadassah, and tell them he doesn't have a girlfriend!

Across town at Hadassah Hospital-Ein Kerem, five wounded soldiers continue to receive care for their wounds and infections. One remains in serious condition in the Intensive Care Unit, and the others are in orthopedics and internal medicine.

A rocket from Gaza was shot down over Maale Adumim, with debris falling in the Baka Neighborhood, on Hebron Street (Derech Hebron) in Jerusalem.  A  tree was downed, but fortunately no residents were injured.

Please support Hadassah.

Today in Jerusalem. The ninth of Av.



Israeli Prison Service Officer Ariel Twitto was on his way to pick up his children from nursery school camp after accompanying a prisoner to court when he and fellow officer, Elad Biton, heard someone shouting "Piguah! " (Terror attack!).




Prof. Ahmed Eid, head of the Department of General Surgery at Hadassah Hospital-Mount Scopus, performed life-saving surgery on Chen Schwartz, the Israeli soldier who was shot twice at close range by a terrorist on a motor scooter in Jerusalem.


Whether it is offering Palestinian medical residents a specialty fellowship at the Hadassah Medical Center or helping to set up a Cystic Fibrosis Center in Gaza, Hadassah's health professionals are continually reaching out to improve medical care for their Palestinian neighbors.


Eleven-month-old Sanad is recovering in the pediatric surgery ward of the Charlotte R. Bloomberg Mother and Child Center. His aunt, Basma is keeping a watchful eye on the curly-haired wide-eyed child.


The Hadassah Medical Center's protocol for victims of heart attacks translates into 34 minutes from the time a patient arrives at Hadassah until the blocked artery is opened, relates Prof. Haim Danenberg, Director of Interventional Cardiology. This is the shortest time in Israel and one of the shortest times in the world, he says.



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"We pray that all of you will go home strong and healthy and return to your local schools," Israel's Education Minister Shai Piron told the children during his visit to the Hadassah Experimental School (HES) at the Hadassah Medical Center's Charlotte R. Bloomberg Mother and Child Center.


Describing Hadassah Hospital's inpatient school as "breaking new educational ground," The Jerusalem Report extolled its impact in a September 17th feature story.


Bio-Xplore, a medicinal plant project of Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Greece, and Spain, was featured at a Hadassah-hosted workshop of the United Nations Department of Public Information (DPI) and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) annual conference. Guest presenter at the workshop, entitled "Changing Lives Through International Cooperation," was Prof. Bertold Fridlender, President of the Hadassah Academic College and Project Coordinator for Bio-Xplore, a two-year initiative, funded with a two-million euro grant from the European Union.


While on vacation, shortly before he was to begin medical school, David Fintzi was electrocuted when he touched an active power line as he got on a train. The jolt, he said, "blew me right off!"


The difficult journey from a diagnosis of leukemia through life-saving treatment at the Hadassah Medical Center began for Shahar at about age six when she began to feel extremely tired in ballet class and found herself wanting to sleep an abnormal amount.


When last October, David Kazhdan, world-renowned mathematician, Talmud scholar, and biker was run over by the wheel of a tractor-trailer while bicycling with his son, he was brought to the Hadassah Medical Center's Trauma Unit close to death.


For the past eight years, students of the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design have been meeting regularly with hospital patients at Hadassah Hospital-Mount Scopus to enhance their healing. The students come in pairs, once a week for four hours, and facilitate art activities with the patients and their family members, enabling them to express their emotions through art and to experience the fun of creating their own works of art.



"If I could do anything to relieve the suffering in Gaza, I would do it," says Prof. Avi Rivkind, head of the Trauma Unit and the Division of Emergency Medicine at the Hadassah Medical Center, in an interview with a Brazilian newspaper during a Hadassah International visit to the country to meet with supporters and potential supporters.


Representatives of the South African Jewish Community showered the patients in Hadassah Hospital-Ein Kerem's Pediatrics Department with gifts during their recent visit.


The Hadassah Medical Center has received the gift of a much-needed Amino Acid Analyzer system from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute (MCRI) in Melbourne, Australia, thanks to a collaboration between the two institutions, initiated by Hadassah Australia.



Hadassah Emergency Campaign will ensure the future for Jerusalem










Hadassah International
Hadassah International unites people of all faiths and nationalities in their mission to improve lives around the globe through support of pioneering medical research, teaching, and healing at the Hadassah Medical Organization in Jerusalem.
Transcending politics, religion, and geographical boundaries to enhance world health, the Hadassah Medical Center was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.
 
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